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Weird Shoe Wednesdays: Sneakers as Ceramic Art by Kang S. Lee

Kang S. Lee, a Korean artist based in Mexico City, has created a collection of sculptures paying tribute to the iconic Nike Dunk shoes. He’s very enthralled by sneaker culture, calling it “one of the most exciting and fast-changing phenomena in youth culture today.”

Photo: Design Milk

Photo: Kang S. Lee

Photo:Design Milk

Photo: Kang S. Lee

Photo: Design Milk

Photo: Kang S. Lee

You can check out more pics of ceramic shoes and the artist’s philosophy behind the concept at Lee’s Flickr page dedicated to the art project.

Weird Shoe Fridays: Paper Shoes

It’s been a long time! Sorry for being away so long. It’s been extra, extra busy in the office trying to prepare for the upcoming holidays. But I couldn’t leave this week without showing you some more quirky shoe-ish things.

These are cardboard sculptures by artist Mike Leavitt. Leavitt is a big fan of sneaker culture so many of his sculptures are paper re-creations of iconic sneakers. But he’s also expanded into other territories, making a boot and women’s heel as well. Here are some of my favorites below. Be sure to look at all of his sculptures on his website here. You can even buy some for yourself! =)

Photo: Mike Leavitt

Photo: Mike Leavitt

Photo: Mike Leavitt

Weird Shoe Friday: Height-Equalizing Shoes

We have a special Friday edition of Weird Shoes today because I just found out about these and they’re kinda crazy like that. I couldn’t send you off into the weekend without checking out these shoes first.

Photo: Core77

Photo: Core77

This was an art project called “Level”  by Berlin-based artist Hans Hemmert dating back to 1997. Basically, he threw a party wherein anyone entering the room had to wear blue foam “shoe extenders”–like attachable platforms for your shoes. Guests chose the correct size shoe extenders that would bring them to a height of around 2 meters (about 6’9″). The idea is to bring everyone to the same eye level and help eliminate awkward talking positions at parties.

On the one hand, this seems like a really dangerous idea in that it seems to take away from people’s individuality. On the other, I’m short myself and I can feel sometimes how my short stature affects the way that people talk to me or even approach me. At the very least, I’d be interested to see how differently it would be to talk to someone at the same eye level.

What do you think? Is this yet another way to conform the masses or is this an experiment in empowerment for the short people of the world? Don’t be afraid to leave a comment!

Weird Shoe Wednesdays: Elephant Dung Shoes

It’s that time again! Yes, I realize it’s St. Patrick’s Day so you might be expecting some weird shoes with a green theme or a leprechaun theme. But this pair of shoes is just too crazy not to post. I actually came across them some days ago and it took everything I had in me to hold back until Weird Shoe Wednesday. So I bring you ……

Anything comes when it comes to (s)hoes ... by INSA. Photo: insaland.com

"Anything comes when it comes to (s)hoes ..." by INSA. Photo: insaland.com

The “elephant dung” shoes! That’s right. A pair of neon bright pumps with beads running down the length of its 10-inch stiletto heel. And an approximately 7-inch platform made from elephant feces. Titled “Anything comes when it comes to (s)hoes…” the women’s heels are part of an art exhibit on display at the Tate Britain museum in London. They were created by UK street artist, INSA, as a response to Chris Ofili’s controversial The Holy Virgin Mary painting (below) from the late 1990s that depicted Mary as a black African woman and also utilized elephant dung. The dung that INSA used actually comes from the same elephant herd that Ofili used, and it may have even come from the same elephant!

Anyway, I think I’ve looked at this too much already. But what do you think? Is this “Art”? Or just plain gross? Check out the inspiration, Ofili’s Mary, below. Continue Reading…